Gear List

This list is the gear I began my walk with. As weather became colder a lot of the autumn gear was mailed home to be replaced by equipment that could hold up to lower temps that often combined ice and snow with long days of rain. It really was fantastic how often I'd trade out one article like my Marmot sleeping bag for my glorious down Feathered Friends Eider -30 750 fill bag just as the last warm night passed.

THE BEST GEAR THAT I DIDN'T BUY

With miles and towns passing by in a trickling stream there is always an open store of supplies just beyond the guardrails, moose crossing signs, and poison ivy. The greatest wealth was usually found going up steep hills because my eyes naturally fell to the road beneath my feet. Just about everything that I needed could be found in the discarded objects along the road. I became convinced that if I just walked long and far enough whatever I lacked would arrive at my feet. Often the only trick was recognizing an item for what it was. I found a perfect pair of Nike rain paints in the middle of a rainstorm on the side of the road. I had already had rain pants, but I did not have rain protection for my exposed hands that held my walking sticks. In a second I had my knife out, cut off both legs of the found garment, tied knots in the inverted tops, and returned them right side out. In less than three minutes I went from cold wet hands to gloved fingers inside a weather-proof shell. The smile on my face sent extra warmth to my toes.

While in Maine my bamboo spatula did a wonderful job blending into the leaves, as well as flipping perfect pancakes. It wasn't too many steaming flap-jacks into my trip before my natural spatula didn't make it back into my portable kitchen. That was the last plate of pancakes it made. One state later I was rewarded with not one but two small spatulas from a child's discarded play set found on a windy turn. They were more than happy to flip real world pancakes and small steaks. I can't tell you how thrilled I was over my found treasure.

Quarters, dimes and hundreds of pennies (I never did bother with bending over with my heavy pack for pennies) were often found, but it was the things money couldn't buy in the middle of Nowhere, New Hampshire; Vacant Street, Maine; and Waiting On Winter, Vermont that brought complete joy. A found plastic water bottle cap to replace the top on a water bottle that seized up had the ability to make my day. That's when you know that you've really simplified your life.

My list of found and adopted objects is a wonderful collection of memories that far exceeds any equipment that I paid top dollar for in a mountain supply store. When I buy a hundred and twenty five dollar stove it is a beautiful thing but it doesn't begin to shine in my heart until we have shared a few storms, tumbled into a rain filled trench, and made a titanium cup of batter into a golden pile of pancakes. Until we have shared the making of memories a store bought item is just a guest that hopes to join the team. When I spend a lot of money for gear I expect a lot from it under field conditions. Now a trail found piece of equipment has already skipped several major hurdles. When I find a piece of gear it has to be really flirting with my eye to get me to notice. After months of walking I am constantly looking for any excuse to send a piece of equipment home. With sixty plus pounds on my back I don't enjoy stopping to pick up things. Whenever one of my hiking sticks falls I'll spend an extra few seconds seeing if I can pick it up without bending or squatting. Usually I'll find a way. The last thing I want to do is stop and pick up every dirty item that I see. So if I adopt an item on the road it is either a replacement, like a water bottle top, or it is something just right for a need I have. Walking down the western border of New York my survival staff wore through the last rubber foot that I carried for it. At three pound plus the staff was instant unwanted weight on my back. Half a day later I was cutting up an abandoned tractor-trailer tube that was lounging in its new home in the dirt along a country road. With some parachute cord and several small discs of rubber cut from the tube my staff was set for a hundred plus miles with a new custom rubber foot. One of the great joys of each morning was wondering what token treasure I'd find that day.

ounces
4.9
1lb. 4.7
10.0
6.1
6.7
2lb. 8.0
2lb. 10.0
1lb. 15.0
4.2
5.6
3.0
3.9
2.0
5.0
10.0
2.9
1.7
1lb. 4.7
2.4
2lb. 8.0
4.0
15.5
2.8
7.0
10.0
2.1
6.8
7.6
3.7
4.8
3.6
9.6
12.2
2.2
11.3
2.2
2lb. 2.0
9.0
1lb. 4.3
4.6
0.9
6.4
3.3
2.4
0.8
14.5
6.5

3.3
4lb
3.8
10lb
1.3
9.6
2.2
6.5
6.0
3.0
6-10lb


5.0
8.5
14.0
13.8
1.0
3.0
1lb. 8.0
7.5
3lbs.
13.0
3.0


Emerson Commander lock blade knife
Nova stove by Optimus
Lakota cedar flute
mini world radio (Brookstone, Grundig)
silk sleeping bag liner (Sea to Summit)

tent without fly-raincover
self inflating sleeping pad, mummy shape Big Agnes
tent rain fly-Go Lite Teepee
first aid kit (self collected in zippered pouch)
Gaiters 8", Black Diamond
twig tea
water transport bag, Outbound
hair brush
cell phone Motorola, with charger
titanium tent stakes, Snow Peak
wind proof fleece gloves
windscreen for stove
white gas liquid fuel in bottle/with pump
sun hat emergency replacement
tripple layer Gortex parka, Marmot , with pit zips
cut down non-stick fry pan from MSR coated cook pot
pants nylon articulated knees, zip open calfs
small can bear/dog pepper spray
titanium cup, double wall Snow Peak
capilene long sleeve shirt red Padagonia
toilet plastic scoop
Travelsmith shorts
capilene underwear pants and shorts
fleece helmet bag (filled with unused clothing for pillow)
med. water bladder, MSR
silk undershirt
two pairs of heavy Smart Wool socks
rain cover for pack, Dana Design
two bandanas
green long sleeve shirt Chlorophylle/transit
med weight balaclava
fleece expedition weight jacket, with pit zips
waterproof breathable pants lightweight The North Face
water purif. First Need
3 pair liner socks
sleeping socks to preserve sleeping bag material from rough feet
Nalgene water bottle 1 qt.
windproof,waterproof matches, stove repair kit
sunglasses with fleece bag
no see um insect proof head cover
Marmot down vest
lighter, shower head for bladder bag, scrubbing sponge, bio safe soap
compass
down Marmot sleeping bag and compression sack, Never Summer
poloypro head gaiter, converts to cold weather multi head covering
Dana Design Long Bed external frame backpack with additions
spare fleece hat
Travel Smith light weight pants
seat pad foldable
tee-shirt synthtic
toilet paper
map
food-often to include-spices, olive oil 4oz., beef jerky Pemican brand, dried milk, coco-coco, cereal bars and granola, roman noodles, Bisquick, Snickers, plus fresh fruit eaten as gathered
pen, pictures of home, journal
North Face fleece pants, tight fit, no zippers
plastic 4mm ground sheet for tent footprint
camera/loaded 35mm Yashica microtec zoom 120
red blinking safe light
head lamp LED Aurora muti setting
pipe tomahawk I made prior to walk
Tilley hat with 4" brim for sunblock
Pat Crawford survival staff
Leki walking staff, telescopic
small size Nalgene container